Quantcast

Six Township Residents Caught In County Sheriff Sweep Of Deadbeat Parents

Six township residents were among 58 people throughout Somerset County arrested April 17-19 in a deadbeat parent sweep by the Somerset County Sheriff’s Office.

The six, who were arrested on each of the three days of the sweep, owed a combined $110,678.16, about 10 percent of the total $1,075,285.97 owed by the parents arrested.

One resident, Omar Taylor, 35, owed nearly $50,000 in back child support when he was arrested.

Additionally, three township residents face drug-related charges as a result of the sweep, according to a press release from the Somerset County Sheriff’s Office.

Those from Franklin arrested, the amount they owed and the amount they paid, if any, are:

  • Michael Ellington, 43, $17,900; $300
  • Abdul Conteh, Jr., 32; $701.14; $0
  • Michael Phillips, 37; $6,404.79; $0
  • Charles Burney, 57; $3,017.46 and $9,597.22; $0
  • Daniel Ligon, 36; $6,186.31 and $17,390.39; $25 an $25
  • Omar Taylor, 35; $38,489.97 and $10,990.88; $22 an $22

Philips was also charged with possession of less than 50 grams of marijuana and was released on his own recognizance on those charges, according to the press release.

Other township residents arrested on drug-related charges during the sweep were:

  • Jamal Zubairu, 30, charged with possession of less than 50 grams of marijuana, released on his own recognizance
  • Carl Odums, 31, charged with possession of less than 50 grams of marijuana and arrested on outstanding warrants from Somerset Cunty, Hillsborough and North Brunswick.

“This operation was conducted to remind parents of the importance of making regular child support payments and hopefully renew their commitment to do the right thing,” Somerset County Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano said in the release. “Child support is a safety net for many Somerset County families. Children depend on child support for their basic needs such as food, shelter, healthcare and back-to-school clothing. Conducting these roundups gives us the ability to better serve children and families with the financial support they need and deserve.”

“The roundup was a great success as far as the statistics show,” said in the release. “What we don’t see is how many delinquent parents pay up once they know we are looking for them. Knowing that they face possible arrest encourages them to uphold their obligations or face incarceration. It creates a compounding effect of payments that lasts weeks after the roundup.”

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Your Thoughts

comments

Other News From The Eight Villages …

Sign Up For The Morning Report!